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  VIET NAM PHILATELY
 

The motives are composed of 2 kinds: geometric figures (linked circles, jagged lines as frames, and main subject describes various ways of life among the ancients. April 11, 1965 (ngay dau tien)

Hung Vuong is shown with the Vietnamese national emblem written in Chinese characters "Van Lang" in his left hand. A bundle of bamboo sticks recording historical events is in his right hand. The 100 dong value presents "Hung Vuong Quoc To" on a flag. Hung Vuong was the nation's founder. The designs of the stamps in both issues were adapted from a bronze drum discovered in 1908 at Long Doi Son pagoda, village of Ngoc Lu, Ha Nam province, North Viet Nam. This bronze drum is the relic of prehistorical culture (Bronze Age of Hung Vuong Dynasty. Images describing the daily activities such as boat rowing, hunting, rice pounding, and costumes such as bird feathers on the head. The star at the center with rays sybolizes the sun as the living force of the universe. Apil 02, 1974 (ngay dau tien)

TRUNG SISTERS' ANNIVERSARY (Ky Niem Hai Ba Trung)



March 14, 1959 (Ngay dau tien)

CHARACTERISTICS:
1. Set: Commemorative
2. Denomination: Three
3. Printing color: 8pi green citron and black 15 deep orange and multicolored 80pi ultramarine pink and black.
4. Size and composition: 36mmx25, 50mm in sheet of 50 (10X5)
5. Perforation : 12 1/1 X 12
6. Printing process: Delacryl-Lithographed
7. Designer: Vo-Hung-Kiet
8. Printer: Thomas de la Rue and Co. Lid Basingstoke England.
9. Paper: High quality - white paper
10. Quantity : 8pi - 1.000-000; 15pi - 2.000.000; 80pi - 3.000.000
11. First day of issue : 1974 Feb. 27th Trung sisters' anniversary and Vietnamese woman day.
12. Design : Trung sisters on elephants fighting the Han (Chinese)
13. Special postmark: A "first day" postmark was used at the Saigon Central Post-office and Can-Tho, Dalat, Nha-Trang, Da-Nang, Hue post-offices.
14. Scott's numbers: 472,473,373
15. Yvert's numbers: 476,477,478

H. M. BAO DAI
The last Vietnamese Emperor of the Nguyen Dynasty, whose nickname was Vinh-Thuy, was born at Hue in 1913. He was the 13th emperor since Gia-Long (1802-1819), the founder of the Nguyen Dynasty, which ruled the Vietnamese people during the 19th and first half of the 20th century (1802-1945). Bao-Dai was the son of Khai-Dinh and succeeded to his father's throne in 1925. On March 24, 1934, he married a Catholic South Vietnamese girl named Jeanette Nguyen-Huu-Hao, the later Empress Nam-Phuong. She gave birth to two princes, Bao-Long, the crown prince and Bao-Thang, and three princesses: Phuong-Mai, Phuong-Lien, and Phuong-Dung. Empress Nam-Phuong died in France on September 19, 1963. On August 25, 1945, Bao-Dai abdicated when the communist Viet-Minh seized power. He then lived in exile in Hong Kong until 1949 when, with the support of the French, he returned as Chief of State. On October 23, 1955, more than a year after the French defeat at Dien-Bien-Phu (on May 7, 1954) Bao-Dai was over thrown by a referendum and his Prime Minister Ngo-Dinh-Diem declared South Vietnam a Republic on October 26, 1955. Diem became its first president.

i. INDOCHINA
Portraits of Bao-Dai appear on many stamps on Indochina. A set of eleven, Scott #171-181, was issued in 1936 for use in Annam (Central Viet Nam). Two more stamps were issued in September and November 1942, Scott #233-234. One stamp portraying his wife, Empress Nam-Phuong, was issued September 1, 1942, Scott #216.The last triennial Festival of Nam-Giao was held March 29, 1942. It was solemnly celebrated at Hue by Bao-Dai himself. Scott #213-214 depict a harnessed elephant on parade in front of Dan-Nam-Giao (Central podium of the festival celebration).

ii. VIET NAM
Bao-Dai also appears on stamps of Viet Nam. On June 6, 1951, the feast of the reunification of Viet Nam (Hung-Quoc-Khanh-Niem), the first stamp of the newly formed Viet Nam Independent State was released, bearing the portrait of Emperor Bao-Dai in western dress (Scott #9). Two other stamps of the same design, but with a dragon beneath the portrait, were issued on his 39th birthday, October 23, 1951 (Scott #7 and #13); There is also a non-postal vignette, which depicted a portrait of Bao-Dai with the map of Viet Nam in the background. This commemorated the Emperor's return to power on April 29, 1949. Another stamp marking his 40th birthday, showing his portrait on the left and the Temple of Literature at Hanoi on the right, was put on sale November 10, 1952 (Scott #19).

Empress Nam-Phuong is shown on a three stamp set issued August 15, 1952, Scott #14-16, and on a semi-postal stamp with a surtax for the Vietnamese Red Cross (Scott #B1); A seven-stamp set depicting Crown Prince Bao-Long was issued June 15, 1954. Four of these stamps show the prince in Vietnamese costume and three in a western style ilitary uniform (Scott #20-26).

iii. HUE IMPERIAL CITY
Vietnamese stamps also commemorate many aspects of the Imperial City of Hue. The main gateway to the Imperial Palace, or Ngo-Mon (Noon Gate), is surmounted by the ornate platform where the Emperor's throne was placed for celebrations. Built in 1833, 13th year of the Minh-Mang reign, and repaired in 1921, 15th year of the Khai-Dinh reign, the gate had five openings (Scott #2, 8, 11).



The tomb of Emperor Minh-Mang (1820-1840) is the most remarkable of Southeast Asian imperial sepulchres. Begun in 1841, it was finished in 1843. Situated on the left bank of the Perfume River, it is set in a pine forest. From the river the scene is hidden by a row of enormous Banyan trees. A high brick wall, 3m high and 5m thick, encircles the tomb. On the east side is a three-door portico, on either side of the courtyard are two lions cast in gilt bronze. Many stone mandarins of different rank, and two elephants guard the necropolis.Three granite stairs with dragon-shaped banisters lead to two terraced floors. There a square pavilion shelters a marble stele that tells the feats and virtues of the emperor (Scott #247 and a coil stamp, #250A issued January 2, 1970).



The famous Soul Porch (Hien-Lam-Cac) is where the souls of all emperors of the Nguyen Dynasty are venerated (Scott #501). The Throne Hall (Dien-Thai-Hoa) is the spacious room for enthronement of a new emperor. A lone golden throne served as the emperor's seat during solemn ritual ceremonies. Built in 1805 by Emperor Gia-Long, four years after his accession to the Crown, it was repaired in 1834 under the Emperor Minh-Mang and restored again by Emperor Khai-Dinh in 1924 (Scott #502).



The tomb of Emperor Tu-Duc (1847-1883) was begun in February 1864 and finished in March 1867. A great stone wall decorated with porcelain splinters encircles it. The entrance, a monumental door, faces northwest. A few steps up is access to the main hall. The scene immediately captivates a visitor: a large expanse of water, on the bank of, which is a dock built on piles. A bridge leads to the bathing place. To the right a green islet, covered by tall Banyan trees, is a haunt of many water birds (Scott #503).



The Pavilion on the Water (Nha Thuy-Ta) of the tomb of Emperor Tu-Duc is a beautiful scenery. While Emperor Tu-Duc was still living, the Pavilion was used as a rest place for fresh air and recreation after working time.



VIETNAMESE TRADITIONAL MUSIC (AM NHAC CO DIEN)

Sep. 28, 1966 (Ngay dau tien)

VIET NAM MONUMENTS

Set of 6:
Gac Chuong Chua Keo (12 xu)
Gac Khue Van (12 xu)
Cau co mai, Chua Thay (20 xu)
Chua Mot Cot (30 xu)
Tam Quan Chua Ninh Phuc (40 xu)
Chua Tay Phuong (50 xu)

Chua 1 Cot:
Set of 4 was designed for the International Fair in San Francisco, 1939.
(green: 6 ¢; red: 9 ¢; blue:23 ¢; violet:39 ¢)

Thap Thien Mu, Hue

VIETNAMSE TRADITIONAL COSTUMES (Y PHUC CO TRUYEN)

Mar. 13, 1970 (ngay dau tien)



FUN OF THE TET (THU VUI NGAY TET)

Jan. 01, 1975 (ngay dau tien) Licorn Dance (Mua Lan) is a joyful entertainment at the Tet festival in Viet Nam. The Licorn is the symbol of powerfulness and prosperity. Well-to-do families use to set prize money and invite the Licorn Dance team to come and dance in front of their house for entertainment and also as the first caller to their house on the New Year's Day. Crackers Firing (Dot Phao) symbolize the joyful transition moment and to welcome the New Year. When New Year's Eve comes, everyone competes each other in firing crackers. In the morning of the New Year's Day (Mong Mot Tet), everybody puts on new clothes and joyfully greets each other Happy New Year . The children express their happiness on adding one more year to the longevity of their grandparents and parents. In return, they will be given new money notes wrapped in red envelop (Li Xi), meaning of good luck.

VIET PEOPLE (DAN TOC VIET NAM)

Aug. 29, 1969 (ngay dau tien)

Collection is courtesy of: Bao-Tung Nguyen, Philatelist


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